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Assessment of genetic diversity of zoonotic Brucella spp. recovered from livestock in Egypt using multiple locus VNTR analysis

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Menshawy, Ahmed M S and Perez Sancho, Marta and Garcia Seco, Teresa and Hosein, Hosein I and García Benzaquén, Nerea and Martínez Alares, Irene and Sayour, Ashraf E and Goyache Goñi, Joaquín and Azzam, Ragab A A and Domínguez Rodríguez, Lucas and Álvarez Sánchez, Julio (2014) Assessment of genetic diversity of zoonotic Brucella spp. recovered from livestock in Egypt using multiple locus VNTR analysis. BioMed research international, 2014 . p. 353876. ISSN 2314-6141

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/353876



Abstract

Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat) from four governorates during a period of five years (2002-2007) was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing). Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n = 2) and B. suis biovar 1 (n = 2). MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h = 0.801), indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.


Item Type:Article
Subjects:Medical sciences > Veterinary
ID Code:39640
Deposited On:20 Dec 2016 11:49
Last Modified:10 Jan 2017 11:36

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