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The synthetic steroid tibolone decreases reactive gliosis and neuronal death in the cerebral cortex of female mice after a stab wound injury

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Crespo Castrillo, Andrea and Yanguas Casás, Natalia and Arévalo, María Ángeles and Azcoitia Elías, Iñigo and Barreto, George E. and García Segura, Luis Miguel (2018) The synthetic steroid tibolone decreases reactive gliosis and neuronal death in the cerebral cortex of female mice after a stab wound injury. Molecular Neurobiology . pp. 1-17. ISSN 0893-7648, ESSN: 1559-1182

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Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12035-018-1008-x



Abstract

Previous studies have shown that estradiol reduces reactive gliosis after a stab wound injury in the cerebral cortex. Since the therapeutic use of estradiol is limited by its peripheral hormonal effects, it is of interest to determine whether synthetic estrogenic compounds with tissue-specific actions regulate reactive gliosis. Tibolone is a synthetic steroid that is widely used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms and/or the prevention of osteoporosis. In this study, we have assessed the effect of tibolone on reactive gliosis in the cerebral cortex after a stab wound brain injury in ovariectomized adult female mice. By 7 days after brain injury, tibolone reduced the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactive astrocytes, the number of ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) immunoreactive microglia, and the number of microglial cells with a reactive phenotype in comparison to vehicle-injected animals. These effects on gliosis were associated with a reduction in neuronal loss in the proximity to the wound, suggesting that tibolone exerts beneficial homeostatic actions in the cerebral cortex after an acute brain injury.


Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Astrocytes; Microglia; Neuroinflammation; Neuroprotection; Steroid receptors; Brain trauma
Subjects:Medical sciences > Biology > Biochemistry
Medical sciences > Biology > Neurosciences
ID Code:47674
Deposited On:22 May 2018 10:58
Last Modified:23 May 2018 07:28

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