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Bragg diffraction and the iron crust of cold neutron stars

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Llanes Estrada, Felipe José and Moreno Navarro, Gaspar (2012) Bragg diffraction and the iron crust of cold neutron stars. Astrophysics and Space Science, 337 (1). pp. 129-135. ISSN 0004-640X

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10509-011-0799-2




Abstract

If cooled-down neutron stars have a thin atomic crystalline-iron crust, they must diffract X-rays of appropriate wavelength. If the diffracted beam is to be visible from Earth (an extremely rare but possible situation), the illuminating source must be very intense and near the reflecting star. An example is a binary system composed of two neutron stars in close orbit, one of them inert, the other an X-ray pulsar. (Perhaps an "anomalous" X-ray pulsar or magnetar, not powered by gas absorption from the companion or surrounding space, would be the cleanest example.) The observable to be searched for is a secondary peak added (quasi-) periodically to the main X-ray pulse. The distinguishing feature of this secondary peak is that it appears at wavelengths related by simple integer numbers,λ,λ/2,λ/3,...,λ/n because of Bragg's diffraction law.


Item Type:Article
Additional Information:

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.
The authors thank Krysty Dyer and Katja Waidelich for a careful reading of the first manuscript. This work was supported in part by grants FPA2007-29115-E, MCYT FPA 2008-
00592/FPA, FIS2008-01323 (Spain).

Uncontrolled Keywords:Crab Pulsar, Emission, Physics, Matter
Subjects:Sciences > Physics
ID Code:22191
Deposited On:03 Jul 2013 18:29
Last Modified:31 Dec 2020 00:01

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