Anaerobic Bioreduction of Jarosites and Biofilm Formation by a Natural Microbial Consortium

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Castro Roldán, Laura and Blázquez Izquierdo, María Luisa and González González, Felisa and Muñoz Sánchez, Jesús Ángel and Ballester Pérez, Antonio (2019) Anaerobic Bioreduction of Jarosites and Biofilm Formation by a Natural Microbial Consortium. Minerals, 9 (2). p. 81. ISSN 2075-163X

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/min9020081




Abstract

Jarosite occurs naturally in acid sulphate soils and is a common feature of streams impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). Biological reduction of iron-sulphate minerals, such as jarosite, has the potential to contribute to the natural attenuation of acid mine drainage sites. The reduction of different jarosites (including minerals containing precious and toxic metals) by a natural bacterial/microbial consortium was examined in this study. Jarosites was used as a sole terminal electron acceptor via the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) minerals. The production of Fe(II) and the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria in the consortium lead to the precipitation of metal sulphides immobilizing toxic heavy metals. Microbial attachment and biofilm formation of minerals have a great impact on the production and transformation of minerals and can influence the mobility of metals. After the adaptation to different jarosites, a unique specie was found: Desulfosporosinus orientis. Desulfosporosinus species are sulphate-reducing bacteria and can be found in sulphate-rich heavy metal-polluted environments, such as acid mine/rock drainage sites, being responsible for the sulphides formation. D. orientis is an obligate anaerobic microorganism and is able to reduce Fe(III) D. orientis is an obligate anaerobic microorganism and is able to reduce Fe(III). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent lectin-binding analyses (FLBA) were used to study the arrangement and composition of the exopolysaccharides/glycoconjugates in biofilms indicating the presence of mannose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine residues. This study provides insights to understand the processes leading to the mobility or retention of metals in mine waste and industrial landfill environments.


Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:natural consortium; microbial reduction; jarosites; CLSM; biofilm
Subjects:Sciences > Chemistry > Chemical engineering
Sciences > Chemistry > Materials
ID Code:66540
Deposited On:05 Jul 2021 14:14
Last Modified:06 Jul 2021 10:49

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