Active Commuting, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors in Children and Adolescents from Spain: Findings from the ANIBES Study

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Aparicio-Ugarriza, Raquel and Mielgo-Ayuso, Juan and Ruiz, Emma and Ávila, José Manuel and Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier and Gil, Ángel and Ortega Anta, Rosa María and Serra-Majem, Lluis and Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio and González-Gross, Marcela (2020) Active Commuting, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors in Children and Adolescents from Spain: Findings from the ANIBES Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (2). p. 668. ISSN 1660-4601

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020668




Abstract

Active commuting (AC) has been proposed as a great opportunity to increase physical activity level (PA) in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study is to determine the associations between AC (walk and cycle commuting) and non-AC (motor vehicle commuting) with PA levels, and with AC and sedentarism in Spanish children and adolescents. A representative Spanish sample of 424 children and adolescents (38% females) was involved in the ANIBES (Anthropometry, Dietary Intake and Lifestyle in Spain) Study in 2013. Data on the levels of AC, non-AC, PA, and sedentarism were obtained using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire for adolescents. Stepwise backward univariate generalized linear and linear regression models were performed. In girls, walking was associated with playground PA, moderate PA, and moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (β = 0.007, p < 0.05; both β = 0.007, p < 0.01), respectively. In boys, walking was associated with all PA levels (p < 0.05); while cycling was related to moderate PA and MVPA (both β = 0.007, p < 0.05). A negative significant association was observed between AC and time spent studying without Internet use in boys (β = −0.184, p < 0.05). Commuting by walking contributes to increased daily PA in both sexes, whereas cycling was only related to moderate PA and MVPA in boys. Sedentary behaviors are not related to AC, but studying without Internet use was negatively associated with AC in boys.


Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:walking; cycling; physical activity; sedentary behaviors; youth; ANIBES study
Subjects:Medical sciences > Pharmacy > Chemistry of food and nutrition
Medical sciences > Pharmacy > Dietetics and nutrition
ID Code:67110
Deposited On:26 Jul 2021 14:52
Last Modified:17 Aug 2021 08:21

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