Dietary Intake and Food Sources of Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin and Vitamin B6 in a Representative Sample of the Spanish Population. The ANIBES Study

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Mielgo Ayuso, Juan and Aparicio Ugarriza, Raquel and Olza, Josune and ArancetaBartrina, Javier and Gil, Ángel and Ortega Anta, Rosa María and Serra Majem, Lluis and Varela Moreiras, Gregorio and González Gross, Marcela (2018) Dietary Intake and Food Sources of Niacin, Riboflavin, Thiamin and Vitamin B6 in a Representative Sample of the Spanish Population. The ANIBES Study. Nutrients, 10 (7). p. 846. ISSN 2072-6643

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070846




Abstract

Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6 are essential micronutrients that are mainly involved in energy metabolism; they may prevent the occurrence of developmental abnormalities and chronic degenerative and neoplastic diseases. The aim was to analyze dietary intake and food sources of those four nutrients in subjects (n = 2009) aged 9–75 years old from the Spanish ANIBES (Anthropometric data, macronutrients and micronutrients intake, practice of physical activity, socioeconomic data and lifestyles in Spain) study. Dietary data were collected by means of a validated, photo-based three-day dietary food record. Underreporting was analysed according to the European Food and Safety Authority (EFSA, Parma, Italy) protocol. Mean (max–min) reported intake for the whole population of thiamin was 1.17 ± 0.02 mg/day, (0.30 3.44 mg/day), riboflavin 1.44 ± 0.02 mg/day, (0.37–3.54 mg/day), niacin 29.1 ± 0.2 mg/day (6.7–109 mg/day), and vitamin B6 1.54 ± 0.01 mg/day (0.28–9.30 mg/day). The main sources of intake for thiamin, niacin, and vitamin B6 were meat and meat products, and for riboflavin were milk and dairy products. An elevated percentage of the Spanish ANIBES population meets the EFSA recommended intakes for thiamin (71.2%), riboflavin (72.0%), niacin (99.0%), and vitamin B6 (77.2%).


Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:ANIBES study; b-related vitamins; misreporting; food intake
Subjects:Medical sciences > Pharmacy > Dietetics and nutrition
ID Code:70096
Deposited On:07 Feb 2022 13:15
Last Modified:07 Feb 2022 14:54

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